Posts by Ed Halteman

10 Common Mistakes Made When Writing Surveys: Part 2

In my last article, I discussed the first five points on my list of the most common mistakes made when writing surveys. As I said last time, although it’s nice to know the most common survey mistakes made, the real value is in understanding how to avoid them.

5 Common Mistakes Made When Writing Surveys

As a survey expert I see the same mistakes in surveys all the time. In fact, last night our neighbor was over and he had just completed a customer survey at a local restaurant. He was complaining that they had asked a bunch of multiple-choice questions that didn’t apply to him. Even worse, there was no “not applicable” option and the survey required an answer to every question! This one simple example alone incorporates the first three of the most common mistakes I see in surveys.

Interpreting Trends in Your Survey Data

In my last article I showed ways to plot trend data or measurements over time (see Likert Scales and One Number Reporting). I want to continue that discussion by talking about how to look at and interpret these data. The Most Important Question There is really only one question to ask when interpreting trend data…

Likert Scales and One Number Reporting

Last time I talked about reporting matrix data in “Discovering Different Ways to Report on Matrix or Table Data”. In that article, we found that a matrix of Likert scale questions is a useful survey question and we explored ways to report the resulting data. Now, we’ll look at what happens when we add another…

Discovering Different Ways to Report on Matrix or Table Data

One of the most commonly used question types among survey designers is the matrix question, also known as a table question. This question type allows the respondent to pick one attribute from a list of attributes that are rated using the same Likert scale. Here’s how to use this question type to collect survey data,…

The Two-Phased Approach to Market Research Surveys

Surveys are the backbone of effective market research. However, the RROI (Real ROI) lies in the actions you take based on the information you get from your surveys. Too often a survey produces more questions than it answers. The approach described below aims to mitigate this problem.   Survey Design and Analysis has pioneered a…

Going the Extra Mile – Exploring Survey Design: Case Study 4

In my last article, I took a break from my series of case studies on Exploring Survey Design so I could illuminate some alternatives for obtaining a rank ordering of a list of items (see http://www.surveygizmo.com/survey-blog/alternative-ranking-questions/). Now I am back with another case study on survey design. A common use of surveys is to investigate…

Getting Better Data From Your Ranking Survey Questions

In my last article about survey question wording, I mentioned I would talk about the different methods in a survey for getting a ranking of a list of items. Obtaining such a ranking has wide applications, from marketing (when trying to decide what product features are most important), to customer satisfaction (when trying to decide…