How to Use Logic To Fight Online Survey Fatigue

Creating a survey using logic doesn’t just mean that you’ve used a logical flow to guide your question (although that’s definitely a good idea). Survey logic is actually an extremely powerful element of survey design. When used it changes the flow of your survey and has two basic goals: To eliminate survey bias by protecting…

How to Create a Survey with Informed Consent

Survey consent, the explicit agreement of your respondents to submit their data via your survey, is a crucial component of practically all academic and institutional research. Human resources, health services, and any other field that collects potentially sensitive information should consider including very clear consent questions in their survey. There are two very simple ways…

The Checkbox Question As Checkdown Pass

The checkdown pass is the last option of the quarterback, after he’s scanned the field and seen that his wide receivers and tight ends are covered. Similarly, there are times that the checkbox question should be a last resort. For example, we recently used SurveyGizmo to survey over 1,000 U.S. adults about attitudes towards the…

The Definitive Guide to Collecting Survey Responses

Now that you’ve carefully crafted your survey questions, it’s time to decide where to collect your answers from. This is not a decision to be taken lightly. The way that you distribute your survey can introduce different forms of bias, and it will also influence the credibility of your data. Consider your target audience and…

Building Your Survey With the Right Questions

Many people jump directly into the “build” phase of their survey, but in reality once you’re writing questions you’re nearly halfway done with your project. Survey questions are like the walls, floors, doors, and windows of a house: they’re vital, but if you put them up without laying a foundation you’re in for some serious…

Surveys and Social Media: Pitfalls and Best Practices

For researchers on the lookout for a qualified pool of respondents for their surveys, social media can be a tempting place to look. However our own recent research indicates that most online researchers (60%) aren’t drawing from public social networks to gather survey responses. What makes researchers so hesitant about mining social networks for survey…

3 Reasons to Use a Timer on Your Surveys

According to Benjamin Franklin, “Lost time is never found again,” and that holds true in surveys as well as in life. We might need confirmation that videos or audio files have been viewed or heard in their entirety, or we might want to disqualify applicants if they take too long to complete an application. Our…

Getting the Data You Need From the Respondents You Have

One of the main sources of error in online surveys comes from sampling bias, which is simply having respondents that don’t accurately reflect the complete demographics of your target population. You take a sample of the population and administer a survey, but the characteristics of those people are almost certainly not representative of the whole…

7 Things to Remember When Choosing Survey Incentives

Offering your respondents an incentive can greatly increase your response rate, but it can also skew your data (and eat up your budget). But by choosing a relevant and enticing incentive you can safeguard both your budget and your data quality. It’s important to consider your audience preferences, whether you want to offer entry into…