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Choice Based Conjoint

Instructions

Imagine you have moved to a new city where you do not know many people.
You realize that you need to find a new primary care physician.
When you try to find ratings about a doctor, there could be two sources:
     1. The department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which is an agency of the federal government
     2. Online ratings for physicians such as Yelp, RateMDs, Healthgrades, Vitals, Zocdoc, DoctorScorecard, etc.

How would you choose a doctor if the only information you have is a set of four ratings for each physician, as described below?

Every doctor in the city has four ratings. In each rating, the minimum (worst) is one star and the maximum (best) is five stars.

Government ratings based on clinical outcomes:

This rating is provided by the department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which is an agency of the federal government. To create this rating, HHS uses official statistics on how often physicians provide care that research shows gets the best results for patients.

Government ratings based on patient experiences:

This rating is provided by the department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which is an agency of the federal government. To create this rating, HHS uses a national survey that asks patients about their experiences with staff, nurses, and doctors during a recent visit to the doctor.

Online ratings based on clinical outcomes:

To create this rating, online rating websites use the patient on-line reviews about how patients evaluate the medical expertise of the doctor.

Online ratings based on patient experiences:

To create this rating, online rating websites use the patient on-line reviews about their experiences with staff, nurses, and doctors during a recent visit to the doctor.

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